Best walks and hikes in Shropshire

Shropshire is most likely a place you have never heard but this underrated county is defiantly somewhere you will want to add to your travel destinations for England this county has so much too often from small villages to town full of culture and history however Shropshire is best known as being home to the birthplace of Charles Darwin but this rural farming county which borders Wales is home to a whole lot more. With not one city within the county if it is a rural escape you are after then this is the place you will want to come.

Areas of outstanding natural beauty take up a large amount of the county’s area with even mobile signal unattainable in certain areas, so if you want to get away from the rushes of life and get some time in nature when in the UK than coming to Shropshire is for you, from day time walks to hilltops with a view which is even perfect for watching the sunset and stars on a clear night I have you covered.

Here are just a few of my favourite and most accessible walking and hiking routes across the beautiful county.

Long Mynd

The Long Mynd is normally associated with Carding Mill Valley causing these two locations to come as a pair, in part of Shropshire’s area of outstanding natural beauty and when there you can understand why, with streams and waterfalls to a range of wildlife across the valley. The Long Mynd itself is a plateau across the landscape making its heather-covered hills accessible to most.

With many walks across the Long Mynd and Carding Mill Valley, you will never run out of places to walk with a car park and tea rooms also available, you could even drive up the hill and save yourself the walk if all you are after is the amazing view which you will get at the top.

The Wrekin

People from Shropshire often use the phase going round the Wrekin but with little reference to the actual Hill itself, but this short walk is defiantly a must-do with 360 across Shropshire and the Black Country that is a must-see. The Wrekin is often believed to be an old volcano however to most people disappoint this is not true, however, the hill does have an igneous background.

This walk takes most around an hour at a relaxed pace with the stunning the views and iron age fort at the top, as well as a café halfway up giving you a lovely little pit stop on your way, most of the way up the Wrekin is also covered in woodland giving you a bit of everything on this gentle walk.

Top of the Wrekin

The Stiperstones

The Stiperstone is known for their more rocky and ridged look, with the highest point being around 530m with the views of this rugged landscape, not ones to miss. The most famous part of the Stiperstones is known as Devils Chair which is one of the 6 rocky outcrops and the point most people head to when climbing up.

Stiperstones have amazing 360 views as well as views back across the Long Mynd and Carding Mill Valley in the centre of Shropshire’s Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The rocky crops seen across the Stiperstones being some of the oldest rocks that are visible in the world making this hike one you want to take.

Clee Hills

There are two hills which make up the Clee Hills you have the Brown Clee also known for being the highest point in Shropshire and Titterstone Clee. The two hills are about a 30-minute drive away from each other and both being walkable in a day if you so wish. The Brown Clee can be found in Cavern Arms and Titterstone Clee in Ludlow with both towns being full of history and culture a trip up the hill and then into the town also makes a great day out.

Both walks are doable by many with you even being to drive up most of the Titterstone Clee however the views are still some of the best, when on a clear allowing you to see as far as Snowdonia (yes you are that close to Wales!). These two hills hold a lot of culture and history behind them and while there may be one of the more out of the way walks they are still worth the trek to them.

Top of Titterstone Clee

Wenlock Edge

This National Trust site is most likely famous of all these walks being a site special scientific interest thanks to the geology of the area (can even find a fossil or many in areas along the edge). The edge itself is 18miles long however there are car parks so you don’t have to walk the full 18 miles and just take shorter strolls.

A long Wenlock edge there is a mix of woodland forest and evidence of its industrial use with the old quarry site still being seen. This gentle walk even has viewpoints which looks across the valley as you go and with the nearby town of Much Wenlock you won’t be short of somewhere to find a bite to eat.

Hope these walks inspire you to come to Shropshire and to add this beautiful county to your bucket list for when in England.

3 thoughts on “Best walks and hikes in Shropshire

Add yours

  1. Oh my friend is staying at Shrewsbury and she was just asking me about places she could go to. I’ll definitely pass on this post to her.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: